Handy Hat Hints

Shower pic by Allee in cyclingabout.com

Handy Hat Hints

So when we set upon the task of writing one of the first drybrow™ blogs it wasn’t immediately clear what to focus on! After all how do you write around the topic of a simple, but hopefully effective hat liner? The science of sweat may not be too captivating and when hoping to appeal to a multitude of hat wearers, from many different sports, which one do we talk about first? Then,  looking back over some market research carried out when developing the idea of drybrow™, we found some rather amusing anecdotes. Snippets on forums from people worldwide discussing their own hat dilemmas and how they tried to solve them. Feel free to try the handy hat tips (we cannot be held responsible!) but we’re sticking with the drybrow™ option!  There’s no doubt we’ve all tried a few of these, so lets add some humour to a set of problems we’ve all experienced when wearing headgear in sport!

One man tells us exactly what his helmet smells like;

“It’s a fact of life that after riding hundreds of miles, particularly in hot weather, your crash helmet is going to start smelling like a badger’s armpit.”

Another relates his to the saltiest sea on earth… “My hats always start looking like they took a dip in the Dead Sea!”

Maybe just keep buying more or have lots of stinky spares?

“I definitely have my favorite helmet and I like to school in the stinky smelly one!”

“My wife asked me the other day to clean out the closet and “get rid of those 50 nasty, sweat-stained hats in there.”  As usual I agreed.  It made me wonder though how many other guys have collected a bunch of hats or am I the only one?  I must go through a half dozen hats a year.”

“I collect hats like most houses collect dust..”

“Being a slap head doesn’t help, as there is no hair to soak up the sweat.” They said it, not us!

The dishwasher trick seems a popular one;
“I have 2 white hats that are stained. I put them in the dishwasher on the cup rack and they came out clean, but sorta out of shape.”

“I’ve washed my hats with soap in the dishwasher.  The next time I start sweating in them, it feels really greasy and my head will start breaking out.” Hmmmmm?

Or try the shower;
“What I do is take the hat in the shower and rinse it with water and let it hang out to dry. I sweat a lot, so I clean them at least once a week.”

The washing machine?  
“I have had moderate success with the clothes washer and then just stuff them with newspaper and let them air dry. They never are quite the same.”

A bucket and a brick may work?  
“If it starts to get smelly put it in a bucket with water + Milton steriliser overnight. Needs a brick to hold it down ‘cos of the polystyrene lining.”

Nope the shower;
“When you get home after your round, just wear it in the shower.  When you shampoo the hair, nail the hat too..  Ready to go without stains or that distinct smell of sweat and sunblock.”

Or sink;
“I throw my hat in the bathroom sink as soon as I get home after every round or practice session and let it soak for 30 minutes to an hour.”

After washing be sure to help your hat retain its shape;
“I use to drape a towel over a coffee can then pull the hat over it, then it set out in the sun.  They always kept their shape that way.”

“You could stick some racquet grip tape inside it.” Absorbability?!

Clever… “Put a bit of vaseline across your eyeline – sweat will go around the eyes.”

What about some chemicals?
“May sound weird, but spray your helmet with hairspray. Wait for the helmet to dry then put it on for a ride.”

“I keep a bottle of Febreeze in my boot and spray the inside of the helmet as soon as I get off. I take it home and stick it in front of a heat vent to dry overnight.”

“Lysol helps kill the germs. Spray the helmet with it. I like to leave a dryer sheet vanilla scented or just original scent and leave it in the helmet between wearings. Smells soooo much better!”

“I’ve also used Odor Eater _ yeah it’s made for shoes but it helps to dry up the sweat and knocks down some of the smell.”

“I tend to really sweat especially in the summer – you would think I just washed my hair when I get off my horse.”

“A preemptive strike would be to spray your hat with Scotchguard fabric and upholstery protector on the inside and on the brim. Since I started doing that I haven’t had any issues with sweat stains…!”

“Once you’ve washed it, spray it with some waterproofer spray and let it sit for about 30 mins,”

Or add a touch of feline botanicals?
“I bought a box of the silica gel cat litter and a bunch of dried lavender buds and mixed them together about 4-1. Then I took some tights, tied a leg and filled it with the mix to create something vaguely head-shaped that would fit into my helmet.  After riding, I put this into my helmet and it pretty quickly soaks up all the moisture. The lavender makes it smell nice and calming too. I used the same one for about two years before it lost the lavender smell, but it never lost the absorbency.”

Shower pic by Allee in cyclingabout.com
Baseball cap in dishwasher refinedguy.com
Biker in shower pic Tim Watson rideapart.com
Image credit - www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Clean-your-motorcycle-helmet
Splash foam biker helmet motorcyclist online.com
Dishwasher cycling hat pic bikeroar.com

Feminine time of the month protection?
“When I lived in Malaysia, (you used to get a sweaty head whatever hat you used) my riding instructor put sanitary pads in his hat to soak up the sweat LOL! Very strange I know but he raved that it worked wonders, but I don’t think it would be everyone’s cup of tea. I will add I’ve never tried his method haha!”

Air vents are a great design until “the rain goes straight in so you end up very wet!!”

Simple scarves…. “For schooling, buy scarves & wear over your hair & under your helmet. Of course, a fresh scarf every day, or even more than once during a ride, will be needed.”

But when all else fails..
“Scrub it.  If that doesn’t work, buy a new hat.”

“Throw it in the bin and buy a new one.”

Or you could just go with the stoic approach;  
“Sweat stains are a badge of honor. Don’t touch it.”

But I think this step by step guide has got to top the lot.  We are really worried if you have given this a go (desperate measures?!)

You Will Need:
drybrow-bullet Shampoo
drybrow-bullet Aspirin
drybrow-bullet Baking soda
drybrow-bullet White vinegar
drybrow-bullet Water
drybrow-bullet Meat tenderizer
drybrow-bullet Woolite
drybrow-bullet Ammonia
drybrow-bullet Old toothbrush

Steps to Remove the Stains:
“These steps contain several different cleaning options. Choose whichever one works best for your situation and what materials you have on hand. If it doesn’t work, move on to the next one until your stains are completely removed.”

“Shampoos are designed to break down body oils so they can be removed. Apply a small amount of shampoo to the sweat stains and scrub the area with an old toothbrush and rinse.”
Seriously?

“Moisten the area with cold water and apply a good amount of meat tenderizer. Work the tenderizer into the stain with your fingers or a toothbrush then rinse.”

OR maybe…
“Mix a paste with baking soda and water. Apply the paste to the stained area and add a small amount of white vinegar. Scrub the area with a toothbrush.”

Actually this one sounds genius..
“Dissolve two aspirins in a half a cup of water. Apply the mixture to the stain liberally and allow it to set for at least two hours. Add a few drops of a gentle laundry detergent, such as Woolite and scrub with a toothbrush.”

On second thoughts your forehead will love this..
“Mix a solution of one part ammonia and one part water. Apply the mixture to the stain and scrub with a toothbrush.”

So a multitude of handy hints for you… but if you don’t feel like risking your most precious piece of kit, no problem drybrow is here to help!

Charlotte Barrow
Founder and Director drybrow Ltd.

IMAGE CREDITS:
Biker in shower pic Tim Watson rideapart.com
Splash foam biker helmet motorcyclist online.com
Biker helmet in sink www.instructables.com
Dishwasher cycling hat pic bikeroar.com
Baseball cap in dishwasher refinedguy.com
Shower pic by Allee in cyclingabout.com

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